Wellness Coaching Australia's Blog

Coach Profile: Miranda Wageman




People often ask how our busy coach graduates achieved success in their coaching business.

Here’s the business journey of Miranda Wageman, owner of Sum of One – Holistic Wellness Coaching for Fitness and Health.

About Miranda

My name is Miranda Wageman and I help people get out of pain and into life. 

I help people be strong, active and mobile, through gaining control of their lifestyle habits and carrying through with their goals. 

I used to be a graphic designer and I have a BA (Hons) in Chinese. These days, I am a Wellness Coach, fitness instructor and Pilates instructor. 

Getting Started in Business

In 2015, I was in the process of starting my own business and wasn't sure what to call myself or what direction to go into - I knew it had to be more than just being a PT or fitness instructor. 

I found WCA, and that was the missing link for me - it gave me an edge over other PTs, and a focus of where I wanted to go with my business. This helped me develop my business materials as well. 

Since then, I've been steadily chipping away at building my business and fine tuning my services.  
 
Initially I started my business just with exercise classes – my niche is seniors as well as Pilates (all age groups). 

I subsequently picked up a few private clients, and then a few coaching clients and secured a number of government grants in my first year. This was a great financial help as it gave me a consistent income and allowed me to set myself up with equipment. 

I engaged Melanie (from WCA) as a business coach for a number of sessions to help get clarity of what I wanted to do and how to go about it. 

My Niche

It was pretty clear from the start that my niche would be seniors. I love working with them as they are honest and are willing to work hard at improving themselves. 

When they decide to do something, they do it, and stick with it - and are willing to pay. 

They are also (sometimes brutally) honest in their feedback, which I see as a good tool to fine tune my services further. 


Having said that, I am getting more younger clients too which is interesting.

Start-up Challenges 

My initial challenges with my business were actually getting started - and believing I'm good enough to work as a coach. 

I had a lot of fears to begin with – all the usual things, like:

“what if I set up classes and no one turns up?”

“what if people don't pay?”

“what if they don't like me?”

Plus, I live in a small rural community, and competition is fierce. People don't always fight fair and it has at times been difficult to be the better person and distance myself from petty squabbling when unjust comments were publicly made. 
 
Running your own business and having to be fully dependent on yourself for the next pay cheque can feel daunting, lonely and isolating. 

How I Stay Focused

Whenever I feel flat or doubt myself, I make an action list to go through (sometimes marketing, sometimes reconnecting with people or posting information, doing research on different classes). 

This gets me out of the blues and reminds me that I must be effective, as my reputation is growing and my classes are well attended. 

I remind myself that people like coming to me, they like my style and they like my classes. 


The consistent feedback on my coaching style is that people see me as a trustworthy friend they can confide in. This is also reflected in how many people stay with me, both private and in class situations. 

Word of mouth seems to be my best friend. And always, always I make sure that I do my own workouts too and maintain my own health so I don't burn out or lose enthusiasm.

How my Business Has Grown

In the past 3 years, I've increased my classes, and also, my number of clients. 

I've been rigorous in cutting out anything that doesn't make enough money - it sounds awful, but I have to make a living out of this. 

I'm getting more enquiries, and I've recently been contracted by a large organisation to work specifically with seniors - initially running strength based programs, but they are interested in exploring my other skills (even extending to their staff) - and they are willing and able to pay. 

Typical Client Outcomes 

Because I still primarily work in the fitness industry, the main feedback I get is about increased strength, ability to continue doing ordinary things, increased energy and confidence, people enjoy my teaching and they come for the social aspect as much as the physical aspect. 

Private clients have a range of issues - post accident rehab, changing food habits. 

Typically, the clients I work with seem inspired to try more, and dare to take more risks. That is, they build self-confidence, self-efficacy and a belief in themselves that was not there before.

They realise there are different ways of looking at things, so if they are stuck, they see new options. 

I think that builds their confidence which of course affects all parts of your life. 

They seem to find their mojo again :) 
 

My 3 Biggest Lessons

The three biggest lessons I’d share with other coaches starting out are:

1. Keep going - one foot in front of the other.

2. Stay positive (you're worth it!!) and focus on all the people who think the sun shines out of your a**e :) There are usually more than you think.

3. Life is full of options and choices - if one thing doesn't work, try another. 

Final Thoughts

Thanks Miranda for providing the material for this profile. 

Having worked with Miranda in 2015/16, I wanted to finish with my perspective on how she is building a successful coaching business.

1. She brings her strengths into the development and growth of her business. 

Her persistence, resourcefulness, positive attitude and creativity have allowed her to come up with some awesome and authentic promotional strategies. 

2. She’s used bought her creativity and resourcefulness into her marketing

After Miranda identified her ideal client and elevator pitch, I noticed something switch inside her. She asked some talented people to help her develop a promotional video (you tube in the links below) and they agreed…but ended up being mostly too busy to help. So Miranda drew on her resourcefulness and created the video herself – her own music, videos and photos – and it works beautifully.

3. Miranda shares her authentic self with her clients

Miranda’s not someone who uses corporate, ‘them and us’ speak. Her authentic zest, enthusiasm and genuine compassion for people really shine through – and those things are her best marketing tools. 

4. She knows that meeting people every week is an essential part of marketing

Early on, Miranda went out and met new people each week using a structured plan. They were potential clients, potential JV’s, other practitioners, hospital staff, you name it she was there. 

When we chatted for this profile recently, it was interesting to map where her current client base came from.

There were those handful of people - clients and professional relationships - who were what I call “your Tupperware ladies”. That is, they’re very well networked, have fingers in lots of pies, and consistently tell EVERYBODY how great Miranda is.

Once you get that sort of momentum, word of mouth referral carries you through. 

To learn more about Miranda or connect with her on social media, visit:

Why wellness coaching is perfect for the corporate market


Bringing wellness services to employees to improve their quality of life, can make businesses better places to work and ensures wellness coaches with business success and a lifestyle they deserve.

We are too often seeing the devastating effects of illness, and stress every day in workplaces, and we know that we cannot fight this battle alone. People are breaking down and wellness programs need to become part of the company strategy and how they operate. We understand that health and wellbeing can sometimes be considered a 'softer' area of business, however, the cost of poor health can really add up.

The benefits of a corporate wellness program is that it teaches people to be healthy and well – and in turn it will help them run better lives and better businesses. Here are some reasons you can take to corporates on why a wellness program is perfect for them.

1. Executive programs
Executive programs are the most effective support for people who require behavioural and lifestyle changes that support sustained high performance and productivity. Wellness coaches can review workplace and lifestyle practices, and develop individual wellness solutions for CEOs, senior leaders and managers. Programs can support frequent travellers, injured, burnt out, and overwhelmed executives who require individual support and guidance. It can provide them with practical and useful tools for sustaining a balanced and calm work and home life. 

2. Group coaching for team collaboration
Team work is difficult as teams bring people together who have differences in opinions, skills, education, work standards, gender, family history, beliefs, attitudes, drive and ambition. An increase in vision and communication can improve the productivity and effectiveness of the team environment. The breakthrough challenges cut through the differences within the team and connect people by providing a common language in which to communicate, and common work goals to strive for.  

3. Increases staffs’ performance
Talent is critical for business and an individuals’ impact flows on to business.  Productivity loss due to physical inactivity equates to 1.8 working days per worker per year. (Medibank Private, 2008). Workplaces benefit from more active and engaged employees, who represent a healthy brand image. Transforming employee perception of work as a site of stress to a site of support boosts not only morale, but cultivates an environment in which employees are more energized, enthusiastic and dedicated to their work.

4. Decreases staff absenteeism and turnover
Poor health can cost the company money. Workplaces benefit from less absenteeism due to illness, injury, and stress, and provide proactive solutions to the rising cost of stress related workers' compensation claims. Employees can be rehabilitated from injury, have obstacles and barriers to exercise removed, and benefit from the increased function of their bodies. Studies indicate that there is a 20-25% improvement in staff turnover in companies that introduce a workplace wellness program (Price Waterhouse Coopers, 2008). 

There is a clear link between a healthy workforce, a healthy workplace and improved staff productivity. However, to really get a company interested, the key is to describe the difference between an unhealthy and a healthy employee, in terms of their job performance. You want to focus on ‘return on investment’ not on price. You want to get them thinking, “for what I’m going to spend, how much money am I going to make, or save, as a result of introducing this wellness program”. 

At the end of the day, companies want an outcome – just focus on the benefit they’ll receive: how will this make them money or save them money and they will see why wellness coaching is perfect for their business.

About Angela Egan


Angela Egan is the Founder of Crack Into Corporate, a corporate adviser to professionals in the wellness industry and a HR strategist. She is also the Founder and Managing Director of Vie Wellness, a consultancy that helps companies build sustainable, high performing cultures. Alongside her work with corporates, Angela has toured nationally and spoken to hundreds of wellness practitioners about how they can earn a higher income, leverage their time and make a wider impact by providing wellness programs to corporates. Angela also works with a small number of wellness practitioners each year who want a hand to attract corporate clients. 

For more information about Angela Egan and her businesses visit www.crackintocorporate.com.au and www.viewellness.com.au.

Belonging - Join the club


This weekend I had the pleasure of attending the Queensland State Surf Life Saving Championships and watching some of the country's elite athletes perform in some of the tough events that exist in that sport. As the weekend approached the final few hours, the big events were being televised and the crowd grew larger and excitement rose. 

The funny thing about sport is that we have long known it is a showcase for seeing some of the best and worst of human behaviour. It is also interesting to observe as an innocent bystander (i.e. not a competitor, nor a life member of any one Club), what makes the whole thing work.

The great thing about any sport is when people compete for a Club.  Yes, we love individual superstars, but the Olympics are evidence that representing something bigger than ourselves is an honour that is highly sought after. 

So here we are on the beach at Mooloolaba - watching these athletes compete for their Clubs.  The Clubs with the strongest competitors had the most people down there watching.  Yet I saw smaller Clubs get behind their members and cheer as loudly and with more heart than often the bigger name Clubs. What is that about I wonder?

And a metaphor for life came up. Or perhaps simply a classic example of a principle of motivation.  Most people have a need for achievement and mastery.  A big driver for many. But we also have a strong need for affiliation or a sense of "belonging". It is my belief that the Clubs who support their members across the board, who value participation as highly as winning, who encourage the less talented but determined competitors, who recognise the loyalty and devotion of older masters competitors, will be the Clubs who grow and who really represent what Surf Life Saving is all about. Caring for our community.

I then read a report this morning on Global Workplace Health and Wellness and see that in their key findings (aside from the health of their employees) engagement, morale and fun were listed as some of the top objectives to achieve sustainable success of a program.

Knowing that workplace wellness is closely correlated with financial success of a company, I could see the parallel between the world of sport (in this case it happened to be surf lifesaving) and business. Perhaps we should work out what needs to be focused on and make that a priority?  It isn't always about winning and measuring the success of a company, or a club, in terms of medals or financial profit. These factors may not always be a good indicator of future retention and growth of our people.

Reflections on a recent visit to Boston


Coaching in Medicine and Leadership” was the title of this year’s conference in Boston. I headed over - spurred on my memories of my last visit two years ago when I came away fired up with new ideas and learning. To be honest, I wasn’t sure that my last experience could be topped but I was about to be surprised.

After an informal catch up with the Wellcoaches fraternity I settled in for two days of intense listening and I wasn’t disappointed with the new insights the sessions gave me. Not only does the conference attract some of the best minds in  the fields of both coaching and leadership, but also the interesting thing was the way each session seemed to link into the others. 

You would think that by their very nature/definition, information on “leadership” might be somewhat different to information on “coaching.”  There is a long held belief that leaders are in charge and play a different role form an empowering, collaborative coach. Yet it was clear that times are changing and leadership in today’s world is different from what it was ten years ago.

The main reason for this seems to be the degree of uncertainty surrounding us all – not only in the economic climate but in the speed with which things are changing and developing across all industries. “The rules of the game are changing while the game is still being played” was one memorable comment made. 

So although I hope to draw on many of the wonderful sessions I attended and pass on some concepts – or my interpretation of them – in future newsletters, I will summarise what I feel were the main points presented at the conference.

  1. The models for leadership have undergone major re-modeling to take into account the business world of today. The four keystones of sense making, visioning relating and inventing, as presented by  Dr. Deborah Ancona  were strongly aligned to coaching terminology and indeed, principles.

  1. The importance of emotional intelligence in both coaching and in leadership were emphasized by Daniel Goleman (until now a name that I was familiar with from literature on EQ and whose ground-breaking ideas have long been respected by anyone working with people in coaching and counselling). He presented research that showed that EQ (emotional intelligence – put simply the ability to relate to people) rated far above “skills and knowledge” in making a good leader, an exceptional leader.

  1. The need for, and growing body of, research in health and wellness coaching is central to its growth yet the outcome measures of reduced morbidity will come after a long process of measuring things like confidence level, new behaviours, attainment of individual goals and life satisfaction.

  1. The frightening yet eloquent presentation by David Katz on just how bad the health of the US (and globe  brought the room to silence and then to its feet.  He brought it home to everyone that there was no such thing as “public”, just you and I and the other individuals affected by the lifestyle illnesses that abound.  He gave us hope that we could “sandbag the flood” and eventually turn the tide but it would take enormous and collective effort in changing culture. His speech should have been given for a presidential election campaign.  He would have won.  The issue he spoke of was one of the biggest problems the USA (and Australia) face.

  2. Neuroscience was a hot topic - not for its own sake but for the information it is giving us about the human brain.  The fact that our thinking brain and our feeling brain are so closely intertwined came up time  and again as did the notion that we are “wired for empathy” as our motor neurons fire in synch with the people we connect with.  And again, those many reminders that the body and how we fuel it, are inextricably linked with better brain power.

  1. The coaching “dance” is now being measured by comparing arousal of the sympathetic nervous system between coach and client as the session takes place. The clients that had the most parallel response to their coach, in physiological response, reported feelings of greater rapport.

  2. So many other great topics and speakers.  I came away,  if not feeling wiser and more effective by my attendance, with a feeling that I am so very lucky to work in a field that is gradually infiltrating many of the key professional areas.  Let’s face it,  if the key people in Leadership and Medicine are listening, who else could be?

Attending this conference also concreted my belief and understanding of  why the area of wellness coaching is suddenly getting greater attention from the corporate world.  In today’s environment, you simply cannot be a good leader without a) learning to coach,  and  b) taking a long, hard  look at your own personal wellness.  Gone are the days when the top people managed to ignore growing stress levels and enlarging girth measures; where work ruled and relationships came second.   We are all finally speaking the same language.



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