Wellness Coaching Australia's Blog

How to Advertise Coaching and Attract New Clients


A lot of coaches ask me how to get new clients. 

When you start a business, you know that clients are your absolute lifeblood – they are essential to your success.

But when you’re starting out, or if you have an existing business, you aren’t really sure what to say, or how to say it. 

You think you don’t know how to get clients in, without sounding salesy.

Just like coaching, the secret to getting new clients and explaining coaching is less about you, and more about the client. 

Let's explore what this means, and how to get it right.

Put yourself in the client’s shoes for a moment.

Scenario 1

Imagine yourself as a client walking into a fitness centre.

You are there for exercise, but as you walk through the doors, you see a poster advertising “Health and Wellness Coaching”.

You wonder what it is, what that means. 

Then the thought is lost as you walk past and continue the conversation with your friends.

Scenario 2

Imagine yourself walking into your favourite organic food shop, past the notice board.

You see a poster advertising a Health and Wellness Coach (or a Health and Wellness Talk).

You have a vague interest, but it doesn’t really mean much to you. 

Is this like a personal trainer? Is this person going to tell me what to do? What is it?

Your questions aren’t answered by the poster, so you keep walking and it slips your mind.


In both cases the problems are:

  • you have NO IDEA how a coach can help you
  • the outcomes you will from working with a coach are unclear.
The advertising did not communicate what coaching is, how a coach can help, and the outcomes that coaching can deliver.

Let's look at those things.

How a Coach Can Help

It's critically important that you have a short spiel that rolls off the tongue, explaining what you do and who you help.

Here's how to get that statement right.

Fact: people know they need or want to do certain things – like eat better, exercise more regularly, manage stress or boost energy.

But you are not necessarily offering them that specific service showing them WHAT to do – e.g. exercise, diet, meditation.

A coach can help you get over the hump of changing habits in a specific area, by helping working with them on HOW they can adopt and be consistent with healthier habits, in a way that aligns with them, their beliefs and their commitments and lifestyle.

A way to introduce coaching could be as simple as this:


"You know how people know they need to exercise or eat better, but they don’t actually DO IT? That’s where coaching fits in.

Coaches help you to develop your own unique plan to get motivated, organised, create a plan, build confidence and find your own way to develop healthier habits that you can ACTUALLY stick to."


How do you Advertise Coaching?

Unfortunately, marketers have conditioned people to notice outcomes and benefits.

Knowing how to explain coaching is important, but it may not be compelling and 'sexy.'

As a coach, that means you have to be able to create the desired outcome or end point that your stuck client is looking to achieve.

Normally, getting in front of people (live, or on the phone) is the best way to communicate the value of coaching.

To get to THAT point, you often need to advertise a workshop, free session or low cost session to give them a taste.

And to get to THAT point, you need a compelling advertisement.

The BEST way to advertise coaching is to use the exact words that your client uses, to describe the challenge they face, and their biggest desired outcome. 

That demonstrates that you understand them, so they feel connection and rapport, have hope that you can help, and are interested to know more.

Hints and Tips for Advertising

  • Advertising copy and images is best to focus on the desired outcome.
  • Website copy needs to talk about the problem, then the vision of how they’d rather be.
  • Workshops, webinars or seminars should take attendees through a 3 – 5 step process (simple steps) to start moving from the problem to the vision.
  • Advertising always uses the exact words, and communicates the exact feelings, that your client has.
  • Note that different demographics use different language – hence the value of narrowing down to serve a niche
  • The best way to get your wording right is to pretend you are the client and struggling with their issue. What would you be looking for? What search terms would you use?

Examples

Let’s say you help mothers of primary school kids who are always busy and overwhelmed with no time for themselves and guilt about not doing enough for their kids.

You might run a workshop or offer an introductory session to introduce them to the concept of coaching and how you can help them.

Catchy titles for your workshop or session might include:

  • How to be a Calm, Happy and Organised Mum
  • 3 Steps to Creating a Foolproof Schedule for a Peaceful Household
  • From Harrowed to Happy – One Mum’s Success
  • How to Create More Connected Families

You can see that each of these titles talks about a positive outcome.

Using numbers is psychologically attractive to most people, especially women, according to marketing guru Neil Patel.

Notice also that the outcomes may not be immediately obvious.

Your logical mind might think the mother wants to be more calm….but a deeper coaching conversation might reveal the layers below that as being happier, more connected, sleeping better, finding time for herself.

The precise wording for your attractive advertising is best elicited through: 

  • interviews, 
  • ‘sneaky coaching’ with friends, 
  • listening to live conversations, or 
  • through coaching your own clients and listening to their words in vision and regular sessions.

Summing it Up

The value of coaching is communicated through feelings and emotions that your clients recognise in themselves.

People need to understand how coaching can help them in the context of their own specific lives and struggles.

Better still, if you can articulate what their fears, frustrations and desires are, using their own language, people will build trust and rapport, and be more likely to take the first steps toward working with you.

Often, the true value of coaching starts with your ability to communicate that you deeply ‘get’ your  client and what they’re struggling with.

Creating that connection, trust and rapport is the essential first step to attracting loyal, committed clients. 


Need help to connect with the right clients, in the right way, using the right words? 

You may like to attend the next free information session for Passion to Profit; a 6-month business building program for coaches to help you craft a unique, successful and profitable coaching business. 

Click here for more information.



The Benefits of being (Emotionally) Flexible




We know by now that improving wellness is a complex affair.  What do we want to achieve?  Why do we want to achieve it?  And for heaven’s sake, what’s stopping us?

I have always had a strong interest in this last question as I feel that this is where the richness of health and wellness coaching really comes into play and where we can support people where they need it!

Barriers/obstacles come in all shapes and sizes. what we do, how we live, what we think and what we feel, are the pillar stones of most blocks to our desired life. But how do we go about changing these things?

Coaching can help people in many ways -  creating realistic small goals, working towards new automatic behaviours, understanding what needs to be done to make change possible -but the really complex area is helping understand how our automatic emotional responses can get in the way of – let’s say a good life!

The topic of “Emotional Agility” is described in Susan /David’ book of the same name.  She neatly reveals a model that can help people stop being “hooked” into rigid negative patterns that have no value in their present-day life.  

Advantages of being Emotionally Agile?

  • Allows you to be in the moment and pay attention to what is actually happening
  • Allows us to live in accordance with our intentions and values
  • Helps us recognise the stories we tell ourselves to make sense of the world – stories that may be quite unreliable!
  • Prevents us from being hooked into accepting our thought as facts
  • Enables us to create space between stimulus and our response
  • Allows us (the thinker) to be in control – not our thoughts

David’s four step approach works like this:

SHOWING UP

In this context, showing up means “facing into our thoughts, emotions and behaviour willingly, with curiousity and kindness”. We know from research that life satisfaction is not about what happens to us - what challenges we face - but how we respond to those challenges.  It has also been shown that self-acceptance creates the biggest increase in life fulfillment than any other shift, including helping others! 

A few gems from this part of the model include:

 “Acceptance is a pre-requisite for change” is a wonderful paradox.  Until we accept things the way they are, we cannot begin to change them.  

“Self-compassion is the antidote to shame”.  Shame is a destructive emotion that focuses in a person’s character and leads to feelings of worthlessness.  It is different to guilt that may drive us to make amends and avoid repeating the mistakes.  Self-compassion is the difference between the two emotions.   Our first step to becoming more emotionally agile is to face up to what torments us with acceptance and compassion.

STEPPING OUT

After facing our thoughts and emotions, we then need to detach from them and observe them, recognising that they are just that – thoughts and emotions – not facts, reality.

We can learn to identify the trickier feelings we are experiencing and learn better ways of reacting.  A very powerful tool in processing emotions is to write about them.   Studies have shown that by writing about experiences that have cause regret, trauma or sadness can have a significant improvement on wellbeing. Somehow we are able to step away from our experience detach from the charged emotions and take a different perspective. Mindfulness is another very important aspect of this stage and it can prevent us from being “hooked” into those old patterns by creating space and letting go. 

WALKING YOUR WHY

Right in line with the coaching model is this important stage.  What are our long term values and hopes for the future and how can these inform our “choice points” in daily life?  We often make decisions based on influence from outside.  Social media, messages from advertisers, our families, our friends can cause us to act under pressure. Making comparisons is a sure-fire way to head down a slippery path, yet the phenomenon called social contagion causes our behaviours to be “caught” from other people. The way round this is to  identify our values about what truly matters to us and make decisions based on the way we hope to live – going forward.   Values aren’t rules, nor are they about right or wrong.  They are freely chosen, can guide us, are active, not set in steel, give us freedom from social comparison and encourage self-acceptance.  They are something we use.  Acting according to our values can take courage.  

“Courage is not an absence of fear; courage is fear walking” is a beautiful description.

MOVING ON

Making small, achievable changes that are in line with our values can create massive difference in our lives.   Building new habits by automatic, repeated behaviour will keep us moving in the right direction. Having a growth mindset rather than fixed is an important part of being able to “move on”. “Engaging our autonomy” is a notion that coaches will be all too familiar with – again ,this will help create the change we want.  The motivation has to come from a desire to change rather than a feeling of obligation.  Stepping out of our comfort zone can take courage but needs to happen if we are to reach our optimal self and be truly alive!

This book is a wonderful source of wisdom.  Although many of the concepts are familiar, David brings together so many ideas that result in our being able to step out of old familiar ways of reacting and enter a new life filled with challenges, possibilities and self-acceptance.
I highly recommend adding this book to your library!

Reference:  
Emotional Agility. (2016) Susan David.  Avery, New York. 

WCA leads the way for Australian Health and Wellness Coaches




Last week we received the exciting news that our application to the International Consortium for Health and Wellness Coaching (ICHWC) for our Professional Certificate in Health and Wellness Coaching had been approved! And we are proud to be the first international course to receive that approval. 

Our course sits alongside other approved programs delivered at some of the world’s leading Universities and Training schools including University of Arizona - Center for Integrative Medicine and University of Minnesota – Center for Spirituality and Healing and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. To be featured alongside such prestigious schools is something we are extremely proud of as the standards for course approval is extremely high and only those schools that deliver on these world class standards receive this recognition. And we deliver that!

What does this mean to our students?

In essence, graduates of the current Professional Certificate course can choose to work towards sitting the National Board Certification exam and become a “Board Certified” health and wellness coach, the highest qualification internationally for the Health and Wellness Coaching field. 

This is a reasonably rigorous process and there is a stringent criteria for a coach to be eligible to sit the exam which is set by the Board of Medical Examiners.  Once you have completed our Professional Certificate course including the extra learning materials and provide evidence of work experience hours and/or post graduate studies in your examination application, you can to sit, and study for the exam.  

The exam is set by the Board of Medical Examiners in the US, who are independent to ICHWC, and exams are available to sit 2 times a year at an Australian examination centre. 

Why should you become National Board Certified Coach?

Choosing to become Board Certified is ideal for those looking to hold the highest recognised, qualification in our field. While holding this credential is not for everyone, we highly recommend consideration for students who are looking to become career coaches, working within larger health and wellness organisations or bodies that steer health policy.

Whether you wish to work towards this certification is a personal decision - based on your experience and your career intentions. We are not suggesting that you have to follow this path, however, we are delighted to have this available to our graduates if this is the right direction and qualification level for you.

In the US, many employers include Board Certified Health and Wellness Coaches in their selection criteria for high level health sector roles.  In Australia it may take some time for awareness of this new standard, however, you can be guaranteed that holding such a status would set you apart from other applicants.

To find out more about what the requirements are to apply for your Board Certification exam, please click here to download the fact sheet.


If you have completed the Professional Certificate with us prior to 2019 or have completed our Progressive Coach Training Levels 1, 2 and 3 and are interested in becoming a Board Certified Health and Wellness Coach, please contact us and we will explain what the further training requirements you may need to undertake in order to receive our ICHWC approved Professional Certificate certification. 

How we get in People's Way




There are many people out there who really want to help other people change/be happier. Some of them are professionals some simply fall into the “helping role” because of their desire to be of service. Most have noble unselfish reasons for doing this. Yet the wish to help does not mean we always do it effectively. In fact, it is quite easy to actually put someone off making a change that they are uncertain about if the “helping” party behaves in a certain way.  

You see, people who are “stuck” or shall we say “ambivalent” about change, generally want two things that are incompatible, or that they both want and don’t want  at the same time!  In comes the helper, armed with the knowledge of what is “good” for their friend/client and proceeds to push them in the “right” direction.  Funny how after the well-meaning advice from the helping friend, the individual often runs in the other direction!  

What is important to understand is that human nature is very complex yet one of our most basic drives is for independence/control/autonomy.. And that means, we rarely like being told what to do!!  Even though we may ask someone what they think we should do!  What we really want is to be able to come up with our own reasons for making a decision, based on our personal values and beliefs.  We don’t want to be persuaded or convinced of what to do.  So how can we help as a well-meaning outside party?  Well let’s start with what doesn't work. 

The following list may seem like harmless enough approaches, yet all can prevent the listener from moving forward:

  • Ordering, directing
  • Warning 
  • Giving advice, making suggestions, providing solutions
  • Persuading with logic, arguing or lecturing
  • Moralising or telling them what they “should” do
  • Disagreeing, judging, criticising or blaming (anyone)
  • Shaming, ridiculing or labeling 
  • Interpreting or analysing
  • Reassuring, sympathising or consoling
  • Withdrawing, distracting or changing the subject!
So what’s left??  

Five simple things we can do that may help someone make an important decision when we accept that only they know what is important for them.

  1. Ask open questions (can’t be answered with one word or a grunt!)
  2. Listen and reflect what they have just said back to them (like a mirror but without any from the above list layering the content!
  3. Acknowledge their strengths
  4. Summarise what you hear them say
  5. Have compassion and give them space.
So next time we are tempted to jump in and “fix” a person’s problems, stop for a minute and ask whether what we plan to do is really useful or if there could be a different approach.

Ref: Miller and Rollnick,  Motivational Interviewing 2013.

What is True Belonging?


Belonging is the innate human desire to be part of something larger than us. Brené Brown starts her latest book, Braving the Wilderness with this profound statement.

It is a statement that resounds with many health and wellness coaches, as experience has shown that most people are drawn to this profession, with a strong desire to connect with and to help others – to be part of something bigger than ourselves. 

Yet there are steps to be taken before this can happen and Brené clearly articulates this by following up in her opening chapter with the statement, Our sense of belonging can never be greater than our level of self acceptance. 

This idea has always intrigued me. Many years spent training people to coach others to improved wellness has reinforced my belief that there is a journey that we need to go on - before we can effectively support others. Or to rephrase this, there is a journey that we need to be on, before we can help others on their own individual journey.

This book really brought home to me that an understanding of human nature is essential to our profession if we are to humbly offer our services and respect the many stories we will hear. Although this book is a wonderful one to read for anyone who seeks to grow and learn how to be authentically themselves, I feel it has particular significance to the profession of health and wellness coaching. I will try and succinctly explain why, below, without spoiling what will be an excellent read for all.

To belong we need to stand alone at times in our decisions and beliefs. This can often be painful and requires us to "be vulnerable, get uncomfortable and learn how to be present with people without sacrificing who we are".

Trust is at the heart of belonging – trusting others but also trusting ourselves. Brené quotes Feltman in her explanation of trust ;choosing to risk making something you value vulnerable to another person’s actions”. Self trust allows you to share your most authentic self with the world. This is what we want our clients to do. 

We are all inextricably connected, yet radical thinking and fear of differing opinions have caused conflict and unrest in today’s world where sometimes, belonging has become confused with “siding” with one group or another. 

The most powerful part of this book is the chapter where Brené describe occasions where people have come together to share collective joy or pain and by doing so get reminded of what is true about the human spirit. “We are wired for real connection.” (This chapter is very moving.). She reminds us that we seek out social connection and the positive effects of it last longer than the actual event. In a world where everything can be done online we run the real risk of missing out on these opportunities to connect face to face with others. We know that coaching delivered by automated prompts can have a positive outcome but what is it missing that can’t be measured? 

Social interaction is essential for our health. In-person interactions bolster our immune system, send positive hormones through our system. Something as simple as a high-five releases dopamine and lowers cortisol level. (Or a hug if you’re not the high-five type.) 

One final section that I loved is when she wrote of asking 8th graders the difference between belonging and fitting in. Here are their responses:

  •  “Belonging is being somewhere where you want to be .. and they want. You. Fitting in is being somewhere you want to be, but they don’t care one way of the other. 
  • Belong is being accepted for you. Fitting in is being accepted for being like everyone else. 
  • If I get to be me, I belong. If I have to be like you, I fit in.” 

Such wisdom from young people. We use this knowledge to live our own lives authentically but how valuable to share this kind of information with our clients! 

Which brings me to that long held realisation that we don’t just coach to change behaviours (although that is a big part of our work), we coach to connect and to help others connect with themselves, with their wider community and ultimately live a longer, healthier life. 

Enjoy the read! 

References: 
Brown, Brené. (2017) Braving the Wilderness. Penquin, London.’ Feltman, C. (2009) The Thin Book of Trust: An Essential Primer for Building Trust at Work, Bend.

Power of Meaning, Pillar of Belonging Part 4: Transcendence


The fourth pillar of meaning that Emily Smith refers to is that of “transcendence” which comes from the word “transcend”, or “go beyond”.  ‘Go beyond what?”, we might ask.  The sense of going beyond our everyday world to a higher reality is what transcendence is all about.  
But how can that give a deeper sense of meaning to our seemingly trivial lives?

You would expect the opposite. Yet it works the other way.

Imagine looking at a sunset, imagine meditating for hours at a time, imagine looking down on earth from a spaceship. What those experiences all have in common is that we are faced with something bigger than ourselves that creates a sense of insignificance and this feeling can transform us!

How does this happen?

In two ways.  First, our sense of self tends to disappear and along with it all the petty worries and wishes. Secondly, we get a feeling of being deeply connected with other people and everything else in our world. This experience can help us get a greater sense of meaning and promote a state of peace and wellbeing.

This should come as no surprise to health and wellness coaches who instinctively now that time spent in nature is somehow more valuable than perhaps time spent working out in a crowded gym. Mindfulness meditation come directly from this understanding and works in the same way.

But back to nature. If you needed any evidence of the benefits of nature, consider this.  A study had students outdoors in two groups. One group spent one minute staring at the huge trees that were part of the environment, and the other spent one minute staring at a tall building nearby. They had no idea what the study was about. After this time, a researcher approached them with a questionnaire and “accidentally” dropped a box of pens. The group who had stared at the trees showed much greater willingness to help pick up the pens, than the group who stared at the building. The conclusion? Nature created a reduced feeling of self-importance and made that group more generous towards others.  


How do we use this in our work?  Keep encouraging our clients to experience and savour the wonders of the world!

REFERENCE

Emily Esfahani Smith, The Power of Meaning


Power of Meaning, Pillar of Belonging Part 3: Helping Clients tell their Stories





















Still on the topic of “meaning”, the next important privilege that coaches have is to help a client tell their story - as it relates to their sense of emotional, physical and perhaps spiritual wellness, and this is often affected by what has gone before.  

At some point, we will all endure hardship and tough times. Some more than others. The story that we create around what has happened will greatly influence how we make sense of the world, and ultimately, how we create our lives. Often the toughest events can alter a person in some significant way and put them on a different and perhaps better path. So it’s not what happens to us but how we interpret what happens to us that counts, and we have the power to change this.

People who have endured loss or trauma may choose to avoid thinking about that loss, but to grow we need to come to terms with the way our life has turned out. The wonderful thing about “story-telling” is that even fiction can help us cope with our experiences. By reading we can gain wisdom and inspiration and learn from others’ experiences. By sharing stories, the story-tellers are not just creating meaning for themselves but helping others do so too. In this way, we can reach out and connect with others.

How does this help our coaching practice?
We often hear our clients talk about past events in a certain way, it may be dis-empowering and have a sense of keeping them stuck. By helping them re-frame their story, but looking for a different interpretation, we can help them perhaps create a more helpful meaning around it.

By telling stories of others, or our own (if appropriate), we can connect and inspire our clients. Note that the latter is only done in exceptional circumstances and we have to have a strong sense that this will be helpful to the client!

In summary, there is no such thing as “the truth” as we all remember things in different ways. If we can create a narrative around our life that helps us understand ourselves better, and if that inspires others, then the job of storytelling has been well done. Stories and storytelling shape people’s lives.


REFERENCE

Emily Esfahani Smith, The Power of Meaning


Power of Meaning, Pillar of Belonging Part 2: What creates Meaning in our lives?


Purpose and meaning are often referred to together, however, having a purpose is just part of what can create “meaning” in our lives. So how do we define “purpose”?  What does that mean exactly?  How can we become more “purposeful”?  

Emily Smith (The Power of Meaning) states that having a broad purpose helps us deal with the more “menial aspects of life”.  So although we have to spend a lot of our time just doing the mundane tasks of our daily routine, if we have a sense of what is behind that, we will be driven by a stronger sense of meaning and less likely to feel that life, well, is like a treadmill! If we’re not sure why we are doing what we’re doing – it can easily lead into depression.

Purpose needs to be defined. There are two aspects to it:
1) We are working towards a stable and far-reaching goal;
2) Somehow we are contributing to the world, in other words, we have a more meaningful purpose than just to please ourselves.

In order to fully define our purpose, we need to do a lot of self-reflection and have a great deal of self knowledge - because our purpose needs to fit our identity; our sense of who we are, what we value, what our strengths are and what is important to us.

Now don’t misunderstand this. Self knowledge does not come from spending long hours thinking about ourselves. In fact, Dr. Tasha Eurich, in his book “Insight” states that “ the more time the participants in a study spent in introspection, the less self-knowledge they had”.  He says we should start by noticing more rather than reflecting. Notice our behaviour and the results. Interestingly, he believes that questions that start with “what” can be more useful than with, “why”.  A “What’s going on for me?”, or “What would be a different way of thinking about that?”, might give more productive answers. Self awareness takes time and effort and we never stop learning. We need to avoid assuming that we know everything about ourselves and keep an open mind. 

But there is a time and place for “why” questions as we know in coaching. 

“Why is this important to me?” is an essential place to start when we are working with anyone around behaviour change.  We encourage self reflection and knowledge, particularly around identification of values. This gives a strong sense of purpose around the changes that need to be made to achieve their goals, and setting goals also creates more meaning in our lives!  

Back to purpose.  When we start to get a good sense of identity, we can then find ways of living with purpose. We may not find a “calling” but if we can find a purpose, we are on the right track. Health and wellness coaching help create meaning in peoples’ lives.


REFERENCES
Emily Esfahani Smith, The Power of Meaning
Dr. Tasha Eurich, Insight
Eric Barker, Barking up the Wrong Tree

Power of Meaning, Pillar of Belonging Part 1: Is Happiness What We Really Want?


















We often refer to happiness as the holy grail. Surely this is all we would want for our children? If only we could achieve happiness, then it wouldn’t matter about the rest (because the rest would be what was making us happy?) Isn’t this what health and wellness coaching is really all about? Helping people find happiness by living “well”? It’s not quite that simple. Physical and emotional wellness is affected by many factors, but back to the holy grail.

The trouble with happiness is, the more we chase it, the more it will elude us. Although “feeling good” may be better than feeling bad, it does not mean that we are living a “good” life. This question has been researched and debated for many decades and there is now a growing recognition that having a sense of meaning, or choosing to pursue one, ultimately allows us to live fuller – and happier lives! There are times when meaning and happiness can be at odds with each other but the former will sustain us when times are hard.

So where do we get this sense of meaning? The meaning of life has never been revealed but much work has been done to try and establish where people can find meaning. Of course the answers are endless and individual yet, like most complex factors, they fall into broad categories.

Emily Esfahni Smith has written a landmark book called The Power of Meaning and she identifies four “pillars of meaning”. We are going to look at the first:

Belonging – our close relationships which often come from our community are critical for a meaningful life. But not only do our close relationships give us this sense of wellbeing but what has been referred to as “high quality connections” is also important.  Sharing short term high quality interactions with people we love gives us a great sense of meaning but it can be just as important to share those moments with friends, acquaintances and possibly strangers. People give value to others and feel valued themselves when their interaction is empathic, caring and showing mutual regard and respect.

Letting people be seen, heard and acknowledged creates bonds. Compassion lies at the centre of the pillar of belonging. Everything we strive for in our coaching practice supports this pillar. Our very conversations can add to our client’s and our own, sense of meaning.  

So how else can we use this information to add value to our coaching?  By helping and encouraging our clients to seek out opportunities for routines and activities that allow a sense of belonging. By exercising with others, joining groups, group coaching? But also helping them recognize and appreciate where they already “belong”. Often we forget that we have communities around us that if we took the time to acknowledge and promote those communities we would help ourselves, and others!

REFERENCE
Emily Esfahani Smith, The Power of Meaning.

Coach Profile: Caroline Silveira


About Caroline

Hi, I’m Caroline de Faria Silveira. I live in Brazil and operate my coaching business under my own name, Caroline Silveira.
I am a qualified Level 3 Health and Wellness Coach, Physiotherapist and ThetaHealer. 
I help my clients learn how to be free of anxiety – it is easier and faster than you can imagine!
I help you find a new way of seeing yourself and others, and especially to perceive your body as your greatest ally. 

Getting Started in Business

I am a physiotherapist and since college we have heard this expression: the body speaks! 
But it is always linked to the idea that the body expresses what our mind thinks. Hence comes body language and all the study we can make of it. 
Even with all my experience, I began to ask myself: if the mind can transform the body, can the body transform the mind?
After going through a process of depression in the year 2014, I experienced the importance of body awareness as a fundamental part of a truly healthy lifestyle. 
Since then, I have dedicated myself to spreading the importance of integration between mind and body so that other people can have an abundant quality of life through the realization of their dreams and goals.
I started my business with a Website, a Facebook page and a YouTube Channel only. I decided to record videos twice a week and write a blog regularly as well. 
My videos on YouTube and some advertisements on Facebook brought my firsts clients.

My Niche

I work mainly with anxious people. Most of them are women, 30 to 35 years old, who suffer with insecurity, fear of future, and lack of self-esteem and self-love. 
I love to assist them to discover their strengths and abilities, to change behaviors that provoke stress and to develop new habits to improve their quality of life. 
It is incredible how they have all the answers within then. They only need help to discover it.  

Start-up Challenges 

My first challenge was to give up my former profession (I was Physical Therapist) and work exclusively as Health and Wellness Coach. 
The second one was to be consistent on YouTube and Facebook to attract clients and the third challenge was to focus only in my target market.
In the beginning, I felt alone and weak sometimes. But with discipline, courage, and good advice from experts it was easier to overcome the challenges. 
I am currently getting support in a Master Mind Group and this has been a turning point for me. 
Sharing my ideas and receiving advice from more experienced entrepreneurs has allowed me to make better decisions and avoid many mistakes in my business. 

How my Business Has Grown

I have been in this business for one year and it was very different than I expected. 
I dreamed that clients would easily come to me just because I am a very good professional. Well, I discovered that my effort and persistence are the best ingredients to have clients. 
Having my business has taught me to be strategist and to be patient. Success is coming through consistent work.

Typical Client Outcomes

 Almost all of my clients look for peace and happiness. In their minds, they were not born with these gifts. 
The main outcome for most of them through working with me is to feel they can get control of their actions and be responsible to build the life they want to have. It’s very empowering!
I'm glad every day to be Health and Wellness Coach and to help people to live better lives.

My 3 Biggest Lessons

The 3 biggest lessons I have learned are:
- Firstly, to look for partners. It is easier to go farther when we have people with us. 
- Second, I do not know the answer until I ask the question. It is good to be brave. 
- Third, being optimistic makes me more successful. 

Final Thoughts

As one of our International students, Caroline has built a powerful practice in her home country in an important and growing area of health and wellbeing – anxiety.

Caroline’s business has been built on her parallel study and personal journey. She is truly a role model to her clients and brings an integrative approach to her sessions.

Here are three things I notice about Caroline’s story:

1. Caroline is open, authentic and speaks from the heart 
Honesty and authenticity are two essential parts of building trust and rapport with clients. Caroline’s blog posts and videos clearly demonstrate these important character strengths. They are undoubtedly part of the reason for her success in online marketing.

2.        Caroline works with clients who have a similar story
She openly acknowledges her own struggles with anxiety and has built a business in this field to help people with similar challenges.
Caroline is a credible role model for people who are on this same journey.

3.         She has ongoing support with her business
A key to Caroline’s success has been seeking support from business mentors to avoid mistakes, to be consistent and to make good decisions in her business. 

To learn more about Caroline or connect with her on social media, visit:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/carolinesilveiraoficial
You Tube: https://www.youtube.com/c/carolinesilveira
Website:  http://www.carolinesilveira.com.br/
Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/carolinesilveiraoficial/



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