Wellness Coaching Australia's Blog

Behavioural Strategies to Support Mental Wellbeing

Posted on 03-9-2020 by Fiona Cosgrove

 
We are all aware of the strangeness of this time and also how different the experience of this pandemic has been from one individual to the next. So many factors will affect where we sit in our sense of wellbeing, but one thing that we all share is a feeling of uncertainty of what lies ahead. Now this is not news. We are being bombarded with media coverage of the situation and the adverse effects on various populations, and it is a time when we need to collectively come together and support each other, however, it is also a time when we need to dig deep into our own experience and understand the effect this uncertainty may be having on our mental and emotional health. It somehow feels wrong to dwell on our personal situation but the danger is that we don’t acknowledge and find coping strategies to deal with whatever challenge we are facing, no matter how small it may seem in the bigger scheme of things. Our clients need support in this time, but we too need to be monitoring our own mental state.

Many factors can result in stress and anxiety. But at this time there are some key changes that will affect many. To name a few:

• Finances
• Job loss
• Fear of sickness
• Separation from loved ones
• Isolation
• Loss of loved ones and inability to get closure
• Trip cancellation
• Unwillingness to make plans and have things to look forward to

Many of us are experiencing a sense of destabilisation in the world as we know it. So what is in our control right now? By following a step by step process perhaps we can regain a feeling of equilibrium during this difficult time. What people often fail to realise is that there are many physical behaviours we can adopt that will have a profound effect on mental stress. That is not to say that self reflection is not of value and changing our thinking will not help, but if we combine the two, then we get the biggest benefit. So here’s a step by step approach that used both our minds and our bodies:

STEP ONE – Take Stock
Become self-aware of what emotions you are experiencing but also what physical sensations are might be indicating that our body’s needs may not be being met. Where are you holding the stress?

STEP TWO. - Identify what is in your control
Work out what you can change and what you need to accept. Don’t waste time ruminating over things that are outside of your power of influence.

STEP THREE – Check in with how you are treating your body
What we eat or drink, how we move, rest, sleep, hydrate and breathe are all physical behaviours that can nurture vitality. If things are not right in any of these areas, our energy can be depleted. e.g. Do you need exercise or rest?
Check on each and see if there are any areas that you can change or improve. How will you do this?

STEP FOUR – Renew with nature
Get outside whenever you can. Use nature to improve your mood, help your sleep, release hormones and general performance in life. We have never needed nature more.

STEP SIX – Eliminate unhelpful behaviours
What habits are you developing that are not helpful? Is it something you are regularly thinking and telling yourself, or something you are doing to cope that is working against you? Identify and replace them.

STEP SEVEN – Love yourself
Engage in regular doses of self-compassion. Understand your emotions and how you deal with them. Be aware that sadness can wrongly be expressed with anger. Talk to your close friends and family. Discuss what’s going on for you. Follow physical pursuits that replenish you. Be your own wellness coach.

STEP EIGHT - Trust
That life will unfold in the way it is meant to. Let go of the illusion of control. We never really had it!

And remember this statistic. A researcher in trauma (Donald Meichenbaum) said that an estimate of all the people who had experienced trauma, 30% of them suffered from post traumatic stress disorder and 70% of them experienced some form of personal growth! And the difference was the person’s belief about the event. If you believe it is possible to grow, you will.
Care for your client’s during this time, but also care for yourself.


About the Author - Fiona Cosgrove

Fiona Cosgrove’s 25 years experience as a business owner, a trainer, lecturer, coach and presenter, positions her well to identify and employ the strengths of your staff making your business a pleasure to work in and deal with. 

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