Wellness Coaching Australia's Blog

Feeling Connected and Creating Clients in Business



When you work in an office as part of a team, you get a sense of connection each day as you interact with others and share ideas, jokes or brainstorm work problems.


When you start your own business, things can be a little bit different. 

Some people run their business from within another business such as a wellness clinic or studio, and so they experience that much-needed peer interaction. 

But what happens when you are flying solo, and operating from home?

We need a way to feel connected and supported in business so that we can find the motivation, energy, confidence and enthusiasm to persist.
On top of that, building professional and personal networks is a wonderful way to meet potential clients and referral partners who can send qualified referrals your way.

Let’s look at the various ways that solo business owners can build networks.

Joining a Health Professional Network

Allied Health professionals often have either formal or informal meetings, social events and/or online groups for the purpose of networking, referring and collaborating.
Their meetings are typically monthly, bi-monthly or quarterly.

By reaching out to the Allied Health professionals in your area and catching up for a cup of coffee or brief Zoom introduction, you can quickly find out which ones are ‘your kind of person’ and find out where and how these professionals network in your local area.

If you are a member of the Coaching Success Accelerator, you can find a downloadable, step-by-step process for reaching out to Allied Health Professionals. 

  • Action step: make a list of 10 practitioners in your local area, relevant to your niche or specialty area of coaching, and phone or email to book a time to chat.

Joining a Local Business Network

Your local Chamber of Commerce is an active business hub where you can meet and rub shoulders with decision makers in your community.

Their meetings are typically monthly.
Depending on where you live, your local Chamber may be quite active or not so much. 

In any case, it’s worth exploring the network to see who is involved, and to ask to attend a first meeting as a guest to see if it could be mutually beneficial.

Often, Chambers of Commerce have an active role in community projects, Council grants or industry-level initiatives that may be relevant to you (e.g. health related). 

  • Action step: Google search your local Chamber to enquire about meeting dates, opportunities to attend and what is typically discussed.

Joining a Professional Industry Association

Every reputable profession has an industry association that acts as a voice for its members.
Their meetings are typically monthly, bi-monthly or quarterly.

Being a member of a professional association can provide opportunities to vote on important issues, but also, it lets your clients know that you work in a serious, credible profession that has a formal self-regulation process and quality standards.

Being featured on the home page of an industry association is another way for people to find you online, positioned in a professional environment.

In Australia and New Zealand, the premiere industry body is Health Coaches of Australia and New Zealand Association.

  • Action step: Contact HCANZA to enquire about membership.

Joining a Social Networking Group 

LinkedIn is a globally-recognised platform for networking with other businesses and potential clients.

It has an advantage of being “more professional” than other social media channels, so may lend credibility and good business positioning.

You may make valuable connections for referral, collaboration or potential clients here.

There are industry-specific groups where you can network with peers in specific areas of health and wellbeing.

This is a great place to go if your niche group is a professional, entrepreneur and/or manager.

Facebook also offers support in the form of industry-specific groups, like the Students of Wellness Coaching Australia group.

Start Your Own Group 

An easy way to build professional alliances is to start your own group. 
This is a good tactic for you if you are outgoing, love people and enjoy networking (otherwise it may feel like too much work – and you’re better off joining someone else’s network/group).

In a professional sense, this could be a mastermind, a specific collaboration project, or simply a peer support group.

Or even better – you can start your own Facebook or LinkedIn group to attract potential clients.  This is a bigger job than the others, but if you are ready to build a tribe of like minded people and have the energy to show up every day, this is a good option.

There are a variety of training courses that can help you do it right.

  • Action step: Consider whether you’re ready to start your own group and find a training course to help you do it right. Or, if you are not ready, join a big group where your clients might be, and observe how it’s done.

Summary

It’s easy to feel isolated when you transition from a workplace to your own solo business.

However, I’ve listed FIVE options that you could start exploring to build professional and client networks for the purpose of feeling supported, brainstorming ideas and creating clients.
To get started, choose the one that feels like the best fit and make plans to join and explore what it’s like to be a member.

If that works well, schedule in the number of meetings or days you would like to attend (keep it small and simple!) and start getting into the hang of participating, contributing and collaborating.

When that’s working well, you may like to explore another option.

Now, it’s over to you.

What is your easiest and most obvious starting point?

Supporting and Upskilling Fitness Professionals during COVID-19


As I finished my last work out at my gym last Monday, I felt so very sad for all the gym owners, personal trainers, instructors and members who were about to lose, hopefully temporarily, their incomes, their interest and for many, their community. As a former club owner and fitness professional I could empathise and only imagine how hard that would be to face.  

How do we fill those gaps?  I can speak from the experience of transitioning from club owner and trainer to Health and Wellness Coach Trainer and Coach (HWC).  

There are challenges for many in today’s current crisis, but I want to focus on two.

Firstly, what do our clients need in this worrying time? We know they still need to continue their fitness program, or as close to it as they can. Technology allows a wonderful opportunity of sharing group workouts and helping people create a way of bringing regular exercise into their new routine, be it at home or outdoors (in a big spacious area). Exercise professionals can help here by providing information and support remotely. But will that be enough?

There will be many people struggling with finances with worry about parents, with fear of the future and this can lead quickly to poor eating, sleeping or movement patterns. Stress can be a big obstacle to healthy living. This is where a Health and Wellness Coach can step in. HWC’S are trained not only in safe guidelines around areas of healthy living but in understanding the need for regular connection and support at the right time, and being skilled in knowing how to have those in depth conversations. 

In the UK there is a move to train health professionals in “Better conversations”.  One website stated that “Better conversations enable people to thrive by feeling more motivated, confident and in control of managing their own health and care.” (https://www.betterconversation.co.uk.). But there is a gap between telling people how to get fit and pushing them to train harder and talking to them about more personal information. Health and Wellness Coaching fills this gap. 

The second need is for exercise professionals to supplement the income that has probably been lost with the closure of their club or gym. There has never been a better time to upskill and learn how to coach people through this enforced lock out while recognising that the complexity of COVID-19 is going to raise many questions and concerns. Sometimes they may just need to talk about these concerns and a trained ear can help them make decisions about actions they take to protect both their physical and mental health. This is where training in Health and Wellness Coaching is so very valuable and can help immediately with little investment in time and money for both the trainer and the client.  


Health and Wellness Coaching Association now launched for Australian and New Zealand coaches




We are so thrilled to be announcing that an industry association for Health and Wellness Coaches in Australia has been established and officially launched this week - Health Coaches Australia and New Zealand Association (HCANZA). This is such exciting news for our graduates and current students undertaking their training knowing that you will now have an industry body working for you, to give a “voice” to your industry, increase credibility around your practice and raise exposure and promotion for coach members. 

HCANZA as a membership organisation supported by key stakeholders, such as professional medical groups, is driving the industry focus on building and setting a credible self-regulatory framework and standard that will allow health and wellness coaching to continue to flourish.

A great deal of work has been done by the Association Chair and Co-Founder, Linda Funell-Milner in bringing the association to life and we cannot thank her enough for spearheading this group together with the Board and Advisory team.  You will see our managing director, Fiona Cosgrove, holds a place on the Board in an individual status and not representative of WCA.

What does this mean for you and why you should join?

  • Join a membership body that works FOR YOU to elevate your practice by advocating to advance the development of an Australian & New Zealand Standard that is accepted by governments, the medical and allied health professional bodies, universities and other training suppliers in our region
  • Gain Professional Recognition from an Australian industry body specific to Health and Wellness Coaching, which, until now has not been available.
  • As a full member, you will have your professional profile listed on the website under the 'Find a Coach' section.
  • Gain direct links from affiliated medical and allied health professional association websites (e.g. ACNEM, AIMA) to the HCANZA 'Find a Coach' register on our website.
  • Network and support for you and your coaching practice
And much more….

Training requirements to be eligible for Full Membership with the Association

Completion of an approved training program with the National Board for Health & Wellness Coaching (NBHWC) is a training eligibility requirement to apply for full association membership. We are really happy to say that due to our Professional Certificate in Health and Wellness Coaching being an approved NBHWC program, any graduates who have completed this (together with the Independent Study Project extra module), can apply for full membership now!  Note that you do not have to have undertaken the Board certification exam to be eligible, simply completed our training.  Our Diploma is of course also an approved program as the Professional Certificate is embedded within it.

If you completed (or are currently undertaking) the Professional Certificate and chose not to undertake the additional Independent Study Project module at the time of enrolling, we are providing all past students with access to this extra module for FREE to ensure you meet the full eligibility requirements. On completion, your certificate will be re-issued with the NBHWC approved badge. Not only will this allow you to apply for full membership for the association, but also now have you eligible to apply and sit the exam to become a Board Certified Health and Wellness Coach. Contact our office at info@wellnesscoachingaustralia.com.au for more information. 

Training requirements to be eligible for Associate Membership

If you are an Allied Health Professional who:
  • Holds an Advanced Diploma or higher in a health-related area, AND
  • Have undertaken professional development work in coaching (for WCA students this is completion of Levels 1, 2 and 3) and are using a coaching approach in your work you will be eligible for Associate membership.  
For more details on membership level eligibility, click here to review their quick reference guide

Level 3 certified students wishing upgrade their coaching qualifications to be eligible for Full Membership

If you have undertake studies with us in our Progressive Coach Training Pathway (Levels 1, 2 and 3) and wish to upgrade into the larger qualification of the Professional Certificate in order to be eligible for full membership, we offer a gap training program that recognises your prior studies undertaken along with prior fees paid being brought forward. Gap training requirements are reviewed on a case by case basis, so if you are interested in find out more, please contact our office at info@wellnesscoachingaustralia.com.au or 02 8006 9055 ext #1.

Membership Inclusions for Full Membership - $200 p/a 

  • Professional Recognition that your qualifications are of the highest international standards.
  • Professional profile on 'Find a Coach' listing – searchable on HCANZA website
  • Direct links from affiliated medical and allied health professional association websites (e.g. ACNEM, AIMA) to the HCANZA 'Find a Coach' section.
  • Use of HCANZA Member Logo (as defined by the guidelines) on your website and emails.
  • Discounted members rates for affiliated organisations' conferences, webinars, seminars
  • Open invitation to submit a blog article for approval and publication on the HCANZA website
  • Ability to nominate for a Board position held by an HCANZA Health & Wellness Coach when they become available
  • Advocacy to advance the development of an Australian & New Zealand Standard that is accepted by governments, the medical and allied health professional bodies, universities and other training suppliers in our region
  • Network and support for you and your coaching practice
  • Access to blogs and the latest research and industry developments
  • Quarterly Zoom Virtual Community meeting with an Expert or a Board Member
  • Monthly 'Business Hours' group discussions with a Board Member.
  • Members-only Facebook group
  • An opportunity to be a voice in a Special Interest Group (such as nursing or dementia) in the development of this new and rapidly growing industry
  • Accompanying this will be the support to assist you to increase the level of your qualifications with guidance and advice from qualified Health & Wellness Coaches.
  • Coming soon Discounted Professional Insurance

There are two other membership tiers available for those who are currently still studying, or those who have undertaken some study but have yet to completed an approved training program to give them access to the full membership. To find out more visit https://hcanza.org/membership-benefits/

Connecting with Clients Online




Even though we live in a digital world, there are so many businesses that still deliver services in a face to face environment. 

In the past week, I have spoken with personal trainers, yoga teachers, nutritionists and physiotherapists, many of whom have lost their job, their clients and their income. 
They are wondering how to pivot and cope with the unfortunate changes that have been thrust upon us, and how to keep their businesses going.
Luckily, most of those I’ve spoken with are trained Health and Wellness Coaches, so they have the capacity to pivot their delivery method and maintain their client relationships.

Coaching is one of the simplest services that you can deliver online, and it is also a much-needed service in these chaotic and uncertain times. Trained health and wellness coaches are equipped with the skills, structures and tools to help our clients stay calm despite the chaos, to adapt to change, to feel organised, to maintain some positive wellbeing habits, and to develop their own plan for moving forward. 

As a result, most of the health professionals I’ve spoken to are pivoting to online service delivery now, with a focus on interactive wellness workshops, group coaching sessions and 1:1 personal coaching sessions, all delivered via online platforms.

Let’s look at how coaching can be delivered online, and what sorts of platforms are available to help us deliver our services.

Delivering Coaching Online

Since coaching is based on individual or group conversation, it is easily translatable into the online environment.

Most coaches who live remotely or work nationally are meeting clients simply via their phone or one of the many online meeting platforms. 

They are having those important, real-time conversations that help clients develop their own strategies to start or maintain positive lifestyle changes. 

It’s easy to coach on the phone, but if you use a meeting platform like Zoom, you also get all of the body language cues and connection that come with a face to face appointment. This is great for my clients who are very kinaesthetic or interactive.

A lot of my clients like writing, and you can also coach via email in some cases! 
If clients need accountability or access to resources between live conversations, they can be provided by email, text, messenger, whatsapp, a Facebook group, or a membership portal. 

Best Online Coaching Platforms

For live meetings, there are several platforms that are easy to use and have free or low cost options. Here is a selection that suit most coaching businesses.

1. Zoom (read more)
A real-time online meeting platform that allows you to meet with groups or 1:1’s for coaching or interactive workshops.
Register for an online account and download the software, then you can meet instantly or schedule meetings, the platform is stable and well-known.

With the free version you can have 1:1 meetings with your clients for as long as you like; they can enter the meeting via a zoom meeting link or they can dial a local number to call in.
You can meet with cameras on, and can also share your screen (e.g. slides, images) or run a whiteboard and use a chat box. 

If you want to run groups of more than 3 for over 40 minutes, you’d need to go to the PRO (paid) version, which also allows you hold meetings for up to 100 participants, and to record the meetings. Higher plans are available for enterprises.

2. Skype (read more)
A real-time online meeting platform that may be more familiar to some of your clients.

You can meet up to 50 people in video calls or voice calls. You can record your calls and also use an encrypted instant messaging function.
If your clients aren’t on Skype, you can call landline and mobiles or send SMS by purchasing Skype credit. For a fee, you can also get a dedicated Skype phone number that includes voicemail, call forwarding and caller ID. 

3. Coviu Telehealth (read more)
Coviu is similar to the above platforms but is used mostly by health practitioners who connect with ‘patients’ such as psychotherapists, GP’s, physiotherapists, and psychologists.
No software is required, it’s a simple ‘click and consult’ program – it offers ‘click and go’ video calling. 

The platform offers document sharing and an online app, and there is ‘hold music’ if your client is waiting for you to finish another meeting.
Meeting quality is similar to Zoom and may be more reliable than Skype.

Prices for Allied health start at $19.95 per month.

4. Webinar Jam (read more)
Similar to zoom, a real-time online meeting platform that allows you to talk to, screenshare with and live chat with your audience.

In the Basic version ($499 per year) you can meet up to 500 people in video calls for up to 2 hours long and can have up to 2 different presenters on your account.
Calls are recorded automatically, and you get customisable registration pages, emails and SMS, and you can plug in a payment gateway to offer paid webinars to your audience.

Summary
In these times of social distances, and beyond that into reaching more people in your business, coaching via online platforms is a great way to go.

There are a lot of meeting platforms out there, but the four listed in this article have had good reviews.
My personal favourite is Zoom because I find it easiest to use, it’s the best value for my needs, and it’s reported to be more stable with fewer dropouts than other platforms.

Now, it’s over to you.

How could you pivot your business and transition into delivering a valuable online service, anywhere in the world?

How to run a business in stressful times


 
Everyone responds differently to external pressures. The way you respond depends on your personality, your thought processes and your personal circumstances.
But at the core of things, stress starts in your mind. Your perception (thoughts) determines your resilience. Resilience simply means the resources and capacity you have to cope with the circumstances around you.  

When your resilience is low, it affects your ability to make decisions, to think clearly and to be fully present with your clients - all of which are obviously important in relationship-based businesses like coaching.

When you’re running a coaching business in stressful times, there are different approaches you can take to support your wellbeing and to feel at peace with your business decisions. 

Your best approach depends on how resilient or stressed you feel. Most people will fit into one of three categories.

Three Categories of Business Owner Resilience

Category 1 – these people are feeling resilient, seeing opportunities to be of service, and feeling ready, willing and able to reach out and help others. People in this category may have fewer external pressures, may be more extroverted, or could be people who have done a lot of their own coaching around beliefs and behaviours. In any case, they have the resilience to be able to cope with stressful times.

Category 2 – these people are feeling fearful or overwhelmed, seeing roadblocks, and feeling unable to cope with the responsibilities of both business and life. These people may have more challenging circumstances, may be more introverted, or are yet to master the skills of emotional balance. They are unlikely to have enough resilience to cope with stressful times.

Category 3 – these people want to help and are seeing opportunities but becoming easily overwhelmed. They may be managing internal and external pressures but are close to capacity. They may have some skills around emotional balance and some level of stability in life. This means they feel resilient at times and are able to cope yet can fall back into overwhelm. Their resilience is ‘inconsistent’.

These are generalisations but they may help you identify yourself for the purposes of making rational decisions about what to do with your business.

Let’s look at some approaches for each category.

Business Approaches for Stressful Times

If you’re in Category 1, seize the day! Despite stressful times, you are best positioned to continue running your business or even expanding it, so that you can help others.

You may offer services that help others to;
  • Get some respite (e.g. online retreat)
  • Cope better (e.g. plans and strategies)
  • Maintain positive habits (e.g. visions and goals, accountability groups)
  • Develop new habits or routines (e.g. challenges or programs)
  • Create more joy, fun, freedom (e.g. uplifting classes or events)
Remember that showing up for others in stressful times takes time, energy and effective planning.

You may tend to attract clients who have similar resilience to you but also be mindful of others who are struggling and may have less capacity to cope with higher energy activities or sharing of information in a group setting.

If you are in Category 2, your primary concern is your own wellbeing, stability and your loved ones. 

In stressful times, you probably have limited capacity to truly be of service to your clients.

You may like to define a period (e.g. 2 - 6 months) to focus on your own physical and mental wellbeing, during which time you:
Close your business temporarily (e,g, block your calendar)
Subcontract another coach to service your clients
Reduce business activities to a minimum (e.g. working with a few select clients)
Consider Centrelink or other options for financial support if needed. Business offsets, grants or hardship payments are sometimes available.

Remember that as a business owner you may have legal obligations to clients such as coaching out their contract, refunding them, putting payments on hold or suspending memberships.

There is also the common courtesy of emailing your clients to let them know that you are taking time off, and to let them know what to expect from you in the interim.

Maybe that’s nothing, or you may continue newsletters, or you may schedule social media posts, podcasts or have a VA do that for you. Just make sure you tell your clients how they can stay connected or when you’ll be back in touch with them.

If you’re highly stressed then it’s likely you’ll be in decision fatigue, so you may find it easiest to discuss a strategy with your business coach or mentor to help you develop a clear plan going forward.

If you’re in Category 3, then your biggest priority will be emotional balance. 

That’s because you may feel motivated to make offers in the heat of the moment, or be super responsive to clients, but then realise you lack the energy or capacity to follow through with an appropriate level of service. 

You actually have the capacity to truly help people right now, but only if you are looking after your own wellbeing and being clear on how your capacity may change from day to day.

Your best approach will probably be to:
  • create a clear schedule of work and non-work activities and stick to it (e.g. a weekly plan)
  • reduce the number of clients you see each week, and set a maximum number of sessions per day
  • pause and reflect on your capacity when a client asks for help rather than just responding  
  • pause and reflect on your capacity when you get an impulse to offer help or run and event, rather than just rushing into action  
  • Automate your marketing activities.
Remember that a successful business is consistent how it shows up. It under-promises and over-delivers in value, not the other way around.

If you run your business in fits and starts, it may damage your reputation. You’re better off to dial down your activities and be consistent with them. 

SUMMARY

Those of us who serve others can fall into the trap of overhelping, overcommitting or overextending ourselves, and burning out.

The most important thing for us all as individuals is to check in with ourselves each day and reflect on how we are holding up, what our capacity is, and to maintain our own physical and mental wellbeing habits. We must do this to meet our own needs and to have the capacity to serve others.

The most important thing for any business - in good times and hard times - to be is consistent. Consistency builds a sense of trust, reliability and professionalism.

In times of stress, I encourage you to reflect on your resilience and make a decision as to what your business approach will be. Decide how long you will do this approach for. (E.g. 3 months? 4 months?) then take the appropriate actions.

You can revise your plan at any time but definitely at the end of your defined time period and get clear on how you’re feeling and what you will do next.

If you need support with your business in stressful times, these resources may help.

Summary of state-by-state stimulus measures

Australian Tax Office information for COVID 19

Business support for sole traders

Small Business NSW (includes info on financial hardship and bank loan deferment)

Business QLD (includes information on economic relief, payroll tax relief,  power bill relief and support facts)

Business Victoria (includes different support options including low cost business mentoring)

Telstra small business support
 
Tips for coping with COVID anxiety (Psychology.org, includes a list of resources)

How to Build a Referral Network with Allied Health Practitioners




Working in an industry where quality and credibility are essential, Health and Wellness Coaches can gain a huge advantage when starting their businesses by networking with allied health practitioners. 

It takes time to build rapport and relationship in allied health, but these specific relationships will help you to build the most meaningful connections.
And if you start building your networks when you start your business, you will more easily build qualified referrals and fill your sales pipeline.

In my local coaching business, I networked extensively with GP’s and involved them in the development of my program approach, and within 2 years was being listed on GP care plans and referred clients on a regular basis.

Let’s take a step back and explore what all this means and involves, so you can start building your own relationships with allied health practitioners.

It Starts with Trust

Even when someone is ready, willing and able to get help with their health and wellbeing, they will generally only buy from someone they know, like and trust.
As a new business owner, you may not yet have that trust and connection, and that’s why a referral network is so important.

Further, consider how much more weight an Allied Health Practitioner’s referral has, compared with a referral from a friend or family member. 
People see medical and health professionals as trustworthy and reliable, and that sentiment transfers to you as a referral partner.

It therefore makes sense to start building Allied Health relationships early on in your business, so you can position your business as credible, professional and reputable.

Referrals Build Referrals

An easy way to get referrals from Allied Health practitioners is to meet and network with them and refer people you know to them. Even if you don’t have any clients, you can become their client, or refer people you know to certain practitioners.

Do this and they will get to know you and will more likely want to reciprocate.

Which local practitioners could you use the service of and refer people to?

Networks Build Collective Knowledge

When you maintain your professional networks and relationships, you enjoy an added benefit of keeping your finger on the pulse with developments in your area, and in the health industry more generally.

For example, I recall a Medicare Local meeting that I attended in my Shire. 

I had the chance to network with Allied Health professionals I knew, meet new practitioners in the area, learn about some of the common problems our sector was facing generally in terms of funding, information sharing gaps and key client issues (some of which I could help with) and, I was able to make a couple of useful contributions to this meeting.

I learned very quickly that these sorts of events were worth attending and helped me to support other practitioners while also building trust in my network and identifying new business opportunities.

In addition, as Allied Health practitioners came to know me better, they understood how I helped people, and could send clients to me that were the right kind of client for my niche with the exact problem I helped to solve.

As they say in marketing, I was getting pre-qualified client referrals who were suited to my program and to my way of working. 

The impact of this was to increase my sales conversion rate such that around 90 - 95% of all enquiries would buy from me.

How to Start Building Your Allied Health Network

Here are five steps to getting started with your Allied Health Network.
1. Get professional business cards printed with contact details and website/social media links (ideally LinkedIn)
2. Develop your professional identity along with a clear, simple elevator pitch-style overview of who you help, what you do, and how you deliver that (see the Coaching Success Accelerator, Unit 1, for a step-by-step process)
3. Visit www.healthdirect.gov.au/Australian-health-services to identify health services in your local area and make a list of those relevant to your services and niche.
4. Decide on how you will approach Allied Health professionals to make contact – for example, would you 
a. send a letter, 
b. phone to request an in person meeting, 
c. book an appointment as a client
d. attend an Allied Health event, or
e. Approach a chronic disease organisation?
5. Start scheduling appointments and reaching out to those professionals to introduce yourself and discuss a referral process that suits you both.  They may have something in place that they use, or you could develop something together.

Summary

Referrals are a great way to start and build your business. 

The credibility and respect attached to Allied Health referrals may be as good or greater than referrals from the general public and, they are likely to be qualified leads.

That means you can convert a higher percentage of enquiries to sales.

Further, you get to keep your finger on the local and industry pulse and help other practitioners, plus identify business opportunities.
What are you waiting for?

It’s time to follow a simple, five-step process to building your referral network so you can general a steady stream of enquiries to fill your programs and sales pipeline.

How do we define success?


















This is not a new question and I am sure not the first time I have written about it, but it is such a significant area to explore that I feel it is worthy of re-visiting and reviewing our responses.  Answering the question will help us get a greater understanding of our client’s goals, aspirations and sense of achievement.  Like so many aspects of health and wellness coaching, as coaches we have to ask the question of ourselves to provide the most meaningful support for our clients.

There are many different factors that influence whether a person feels “successful” in life.
Let’s consider the external factors.  We live in a world where relativity is a fact of life - the inevitable tendency to compare helps us define normal, exceptional and perhaps just plain “odd”.  “We are wired for comparison” according to Mark Manson.  Success and failure are somewhere different concepts but both frequently influenced by what others think.

Common ways of measuring success:

Financial – many people feel that success is only theirs when they hit their financial goals.  Money is extremely important to them and they spend much of their life working towards that notion of “success”.  Whether this healthy or not is irrelevant – it just is what they do and how they feel. It may come from parental values, from a fear of not having enough or any one of a multitude of reasons from their past.  Interestingly, people who value money often report that they never feel financially sound and they are often striving for more to achieve that end.

Status – this is all about how other people see us.  Status cannot exist without there being a hierarcy.. Someone has to be below us to feel successful in this realm.

Accumulation – plain gathering of “more” drives many people and the sheer fact that they own an abundance of things makes them feel successful.  But do they ever stop the need to acquire?  Will there always be an empty void which can only be further acquisition?

The satisfaction that we get from achieving a goal  – or not?

“Society values success and there is a competitive edge to most aspects of our world” writes Chris Skellett when he describes why people can lean too much towards an achievement orientation.

Yet it is really useful to remember something about goals.  The pleasure we get when we succeed at an important goal can be quite short-lived.  We call this “post goal attainment positive affect”.  However, when we are working towards a goal, the steps along the way often provide “pre-goal attainment positive affect.  The reality is most pleasure is felt along the way – hence the term “the progress principle”.

But how does this all fit into our definition of success?

Define success internally, not externally
This phrase had a powerful impact on me.  It reminded me that so very often we define success based on what other people think.  (see all the above examples listed above.) If we can shift our measuring stick to one of internal values, we may well be on to something that can reduce stress, anxiety and the feeling of being continually deficient in our lives.

When we ask ourselves certain questions such as the following, we can get closer to refining the way we look at success in our own lives.
“Would you rather be well off and work in a job you hate, or have a lower income and work in a job you love?’
Would you rather be famous and influential for something that has little importance, or be anonymous and working on something that could make a difference to the world?”

When we truly define what is important to us, only then can we decide whether we are successful or not. Stand back and take a look at your life and decide whether there are days when you feel you are failing and ask whose measuring stick you are using?  Do you see yourself as successful in other ways?  Once we have this self knowledge only then can we support our clients identifying their ways of measuring success.

References:
Jonhathan Haidt, The Happiness Hypothesis
Mark Manson,https://markmanson.net/5-mindsets-that-create-success
Chris Skellett, When Happiness is not enough

Personal and Professional Development for Health and Wellness Coaches


When you work as a coach, it’s important that you walk your talk, stay abreast of industry changes, and maintain your currency professional skills.
Your commitment to ongoing personal and professional development shows your commitment to self-improvement, professionalism and professional integrity.Let’s look at some options for personal and professional development.

Personal Development for Coaches

Four main strategies for personal development include:

1. Hiring your own coach
Hiring your own coach means improving your physical or mental habits to further your own personal growth, to deal with change in a healthy way, and/or to achieve new goals.
It also demonstrates that you believe in what you do enough that you’d also buy it yourself.

2. Self-coaching
Self-coaching could include post-session reflections, using thought models, talking to yourself or journaling as part of a pro-active routine. Being proactive with these habits means we are being role models for our clients.

3. Ongoing learning
Coaches are professional communicators, so it makes sense to learn or polish up personal skills that help us to become better communicators.

4. Mentoring
Conversations with mentors can help you to gain wisdom and perspective by learning from someone who has done or is doing what you seek to achieve.

Professional Development for Coaches

Industry bodies are organisations that aim to advance a specific profession by providing guidelines, standards and recognition of a professional’s education and experience. 
While not a formal requirement, Health and Wellness Coaches may choose to be credentialed by either the National Board-Certified Health and Wellness Coaches (NBCHWC) or the International Coaching Federation (ICF).

Whether or not you have membership with an industry body, ongoing education demonstrates your commitment to your profession and your clients.
Coaches who are certified with NBCHWC or ICF must commit to the following professional development requirements; these requirements provide a good guideline around ongoing education needs for non-certified coaches. 

National Board-Certified Health & Wellness Coaches
Coaches who have NBCHWC credentialing are required to re-certify every 3 years by completing 36 hours of continuing education related to health and wellness coaching. 

International Coaching Federation (ICF)
Coaches who have ICF credentialing have specific requirements depending on the level of credentialing they hold. 

For the Associate Certified Coach (ACC) (the basic level), the requirements are:
Receiving 10 hours of Mentor Coaching over a minimum of three months
At least 40 hours of Continuing Coach Education (CCE) completed in the three years since the initial award of your credential or since your last credential renewal
Mentoring involves coaching with feedback in a safe and collaborative way, to identify strengths and areas for improvement. It is highly recommended for coaches who have no means of obtaining feedback on their coaching skills and techniques.

Summary

If you work the field of personal development, then it’s essential that you walk your talk. 

Ongoing personal and professional demonstrate your commitment to your craft, your desire to grow as a person and a coach, and a means of maintaining currency and standards in the industry. 
A weekly personal routine is a mainstay for health and wellness coaches. Professionally, 10 - 15 hours of formal training plus additional mentoring (3 – 5 hours) per year is a valuable for increasing a coach’s capacity and skill. 


Coach Profile: Wendy Trevarthen


One of our coaching graduates who is making real headway is Wendy Trevarthen, from Healthy Options Now.

Wendy is a nurse and has since attained several other qualifications to move into the wellness space and enhance her service offering.
Wendy's qualifications:  Bachelor of Health Science (Nursing), Post Graduate Certificate in Cancer Nursing, Certificate 4 Personal Training, Level 3 Wellness Coaching WCA.


What is your business all about?

I enable MidLifers to find their Mojo by gaining clarity around their mindset, nutrition and movement. 
Having worked in nursing for many years, I saw numerous women who were busy at work and supporting others, then reaching midlife and realising that they needed to make more time for their own health and wellbeing.
A lot of changes happen at this stage in life. We question what we want and we start looking ahead to work out how to deal with the health challenges that may come up.
I love working with people in this area as we really ‘get’ each other and I enjoy helping these people to set and achieve goals that boost their physical and mental health.

Getting Started in Business

I had a pre-existing personal training and group fitness business prior to finishing my level 3 coaching course. I entered the level 2 course as a CPD requirement for my Certificate 4 in Fitness, and found it complemented my nursing career so well that I wanted to go on to do Level 3, mid 2017.
While I was doing my Level 3 Coaching, I also completed the Passion to Profit course (WCA), as I wanted to learn more about expanding my business and setting up systems and processes. 
The course was invaluable and I had to review everything that I had done to date. I am still referring to the work done during this course.
I have also now authored my first book “MidLife Mojo. You are 50, Cut the Crap” and have enlisted other business mentors, and networked widely both face to face and online.
After completing Level 3, I got engagement from my existing clients and offered them a 1:1 package following on from their fitness goals. From there word of mouth referrals came through, and I improved my profile through social media, and stayed connected with my local community groups. 
I also joined with local Networking groups, commenced public speaking last year following the publication of my first book, and have recently been interviewed on radio. 
I know compliment my 1:1 session with an 8-week program, which I am looking to move online this year. 

My Niche

MidLifers particularly busy women, (45-60, or biologically equivalent) who are having challenges with their health, or they perceived that their future health may be compromised with the lifestyle they are leading at present. 
I love working with this group, as I relate well with them, and seem to ‘talk’ their language. 
Having survived many of the issues that they are living, they trust me, and open up more easily about themselves. I get a fantastic sense of pride when they achieve their predetermined goals, and also when they accomplish new ones along the way as a by-product of their work.

Start-up Challenges

The main challenge was facing my own fears around being confident with my coaching skills. 
Even though I had been nursing for over 25 years, I found a vast difference to teaching someone about health conditions and treatment to coaching them towards being self-empowered to take control of their own destiny. 
I am a great believer myself in following someone who knows and lives their talk, and for me I have always found it easy to become distracted with my own health goals. Staying accountable for myself has been one of the stumbling blocks that I have had to work through, in order to maintain trust with my clients. 
Going through this process was hard. I felt vulnerable, and also felt that I had to shift this vulnerability emotion into focussing on the client’s pain points, and helping them achieve their goals, and not my own. 
I get great energy from helping others and seeing their successes.  The energy from this experience is what I aim for, to see the clients’ self-confidence soar, and the expressions on their faces when we reflect on their journey and see how far they have come.  

How my business has grown

My business is currently shifting from 1:1 to a mixture of 1:1 and 1:many with online strategies. 
My clients fed back to me that they wanted a more time efficient way of receiving coaching, and within this online world, they suggested to me to move into this reality. So, this is what I am doing at present. 
Exploring the different ways that this can be done is fun, and expands the funnel where location is no longer a restriction. 
I expect this to take a fair bit of preparation work, and my expectations are that I need to convey a point of difference out there to my unique clients. 
I feel that once that this is done, my time freedom will be a greater, and that once it is set up, that it will be relatively straight forward to review and update. 
My clients often achieve far greater outcomes than what they come into the sessions expecting. It’s the confidence, and side health issues that improve as a result. It affects their lives by having a domino effect on their immediate family and close circle of friends. They report that they have a ripple effect of influence around them. 

My 3 big lessons

In the last 4 years I have learned how listen more, to myself, to my clients and to my business mentors and colleagues. 
What I think my clients need does necessarily equate to what their pain points are, and their best journey forward. 
I picked my business name in the beginning as Healthy Options Now, and this has been so appropriate, as it fosters a sense of making healthier options, today, not tomorrow, not next week, but today. I have not needed to change this as it is still relevant. 

Final Thoughts

Wendy is a determined person and I am enjoying seeing Wendy’s success as a result of her consistent online presence.
Like many of our other graduate coaches, Wendy has some traits that have helped her to succeed:

1. Wendy is persistent
Wendy has simply worked out what to do, and consistently showed up to do the work. That applies to everything she’s done, from study, to learning about business, to developing an online presence, to writing her book. Persistence pays; Wendy is becoming known, liked and trusted.

2. She is honest
If you’ve ever spoken with Wendy, you’ll know that she is honest with others and with herself. Honesty is a great trait for an entrepreneur to have; it conveys authenticity and garners respect.

3. She has been willing to ask for help.
At every step of the way, Wendy has sought help to learn how to do certain things in her business and marketing. This has helped her to walk a straight line from graduation to a growing business, without wasting time and energy along the way.

Wendy is an inspiration and an emerging leader in the health and wellness coaching industry.

To learn more about Wendy or connect with her on social media, visit her:

Coach Profile: Shreen El Masry



Shreen El Masry, from Be You Be Free in Sydney.
Shreen started her business as a personal trainer and has since attained several other qualifications to enhance her service offering.
Qualifications: Graduate Certificate in Wellness, Certified Intuitive Eating Counsellor, Wellness Coaching Level 1, 2 and 3, Cert III and IV in Personal Training, Bootcamp Instructor, Punchfit Trainer Level 1.

What is your business all about?

I believe that all women have the right to feel good about themselves no matter what shape and size they are. Our self-worth should not be based on the way we look, or what we weigh, and we shouldn’t have to feel this way. 
I am so passionate in helping women break free from the dieting cycle so they can spend their time on the things that matter to them the most and live their lives to the fullest. 
The core of my work is to help women build confidence and trust in their eating, make peace with food and their bodies, have fun with exercise and create a realistic and balanced approach to their wellbeing in a supportive and comfortable community.

Getting Started in Business 

My business was already running before completing Level 3 coaching course with Wellness Coaching Australia. 
The skills I learnt from level 3 enabled me to target my niche and develop my coaching skills so I could help people find their own process to create wellness.
I undertook a marketing course and Wellness Coaching Australia business courses with Melanie to narrow down my niche. As a result, I rewrote all my ad copy and my target persona and got really clear on exactly who I was helping, and with what.

My Niche

My target market is women between 25-40. 
They have hit ‘diet rock bottom’ and they struggle with body image and self-esteem. They want to heal their relationship with food and their body. 
I have been through this struggle myself, which made me the person I am today, and now all I want to do is help others and to be a role model to them through my own journey.

Start-up Challenges

There were so many challenges in the beginning! 
One of the main ones was not being specific enough with my target audience and marketing. It took me a while to clear on my messaging and as a result, I ended up taking on clients that didn’t quite fit my values.
Having said that, I see every challenge as an opportunity to grow and learn. My business would not be what it is today without those challenges and for that I grateful. 
What got me through was my determination and passion.

How my business has grown

These days, things are much better and easier. I am very clear on my marketing, messaging and values. 
I am attracting the rights sorts of clients and we connect well. They are getting the meaningful results they want. I love my work!
One important pillar of my business has been creating community – a supportive and comfortable environment where they can share their challenges and wins. 
Their results are extremely gratifying,
After working with me, my clients are able to go out for and enjoy dinner and cocktails with friends without the sense of nagging guilt that they used to have.  
They can look in the mirror and like what they see.
They have a newfound respect for themselves and they feel confident in their body. 
All of these results are possible because they’ve done the work required to heal their relationship with food and exercise and to find realistic ways to manage these areas without judgement or guilt.

My 3 big lessons

The three biggest lessons I have learned about starting my business are:
- Get clear on your marketing and messaging. It is what you need to get right to attract the right clients.
- See every mistake as an opportunity to learn and grow.
- Take a break! Time out and self-care is an important part of renewing your enthusiasm for your business because it allows you to stand back and see the bigger picture.

Final Thoughts

I have really enjoyed working with Shreen through her study with Wellness Coaching Australia and seeing her personal growth and confidence increase as she has gone through this journey.

Like many of our other graduate coaches, Shreen has some traits that have helped her to succeed:

1. Shreen is persistent
She has had the ‘stickability’ to keep going, even when she has felt confused or stuck, and the patience to know that marketing is a longer term game.

2. She has courage
Shreen has had the courage to liaise with her ideal clients to seek their feedback and opinions, thoughts and needs. This means she’s developed a client-centred business. 
She’s also had the courage to try different things and not give up when something didn’t work.

3. She has been willing to ask for help.
Shreen has recognised the importance of investing in business and marketing knowledge and to get help with the areas that would help her to add coaching to her existing business, and pivot slightly in her approach and messaging.

To learn more about Shreen or connect with her on social media, visit:

Her Website: http://beyoubefree.com.au/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/beyoubefreecoogee/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/beyoubefree.com.au/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com.au/beyoubefreecoogee/


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